All Events Related to: Elizabeth Wickes


CIRSS Seminar: What Happens When Your Data Aren’t Numbers?
2020-01-31
Many researchers and analysts work with data heavily populated with text, or are loosely structured text, and images. Many tutorials, training, and packages presume a purely numerical world, or ignore the transformations necessary for preparing this kind of data for numerical analysis. This talk will focus on highlighting the transformation pathways for this kind of data, exploring the consequences of not including this kind of data in tutorials, and suggestions for understanding the needs of these data projects.

Mini bio:
Elizabeth Wickes is a Lecturer at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois, where she teaches programming, data curation, and information technology courses.  She was previously a Data Curation Specialist for the Research Data Service at the University Library of the University of Illinois, and the Curation Manager for Wolfram|Alpha. She currently co-organizes the Champaign-Urbana Python user group, has been a Carpentries instructor since 2015, trainer since 2017, an elected member of The Carpentries’ Executive Council for 2018-2020, and serving as Chair of the Executive Council for 2020.

[Reprise of a PyData Ann Arbor talk in December 2019.]Read more




CIRSS Seminar: Reproducible education: What teaching can learn from open science practices
2018-10-19
Slide decks are often considered a universal currency in higher education. They are passed down over time to new instructors, given to students who missed class, and generally treated as the sole piece of writing necessary to deliver a lesson or class. Their universality does not mean they can fully replicate the educational experience, particularly in a technical context. The semester/quarter educational cycle creates a constant demand for reuse of not only one’s own lesson materials but also lessons crafted by others.

As practitioners of open science begin to migrate their educational material into platforms like GitHub and release them under permissive reuse licenses, the possibilities of reuse begin to align neatly with reproducible science practices. (And the challenges that instructors reusing materials face happen to be very similar to those of researchers attempting to reuse data or complete replication studies.) Tools like the Jupyter Notebook provide an excellent platform to combine narrative instruction and code in a single document. This narrative can be written for readers and presenters, making it valuable for students as an independent educational document and a basis for rerunning a lecture. Harnessing their rendering features, Jupyter notebooks stored in a public repository like GitHub can now be stored with additional documents, metadata, and provenance information. The benefits of this approach include:
Elizabeth Wickes explains how open science practices can be used in an educational context and why they are best facilitated by tools like the Jupyter Notebook. Along the way, Elizabeth shares pointers and suggestions that are relevant to both formal (e.g., academic) and informal (e.g., internal training, documentation, tutorials, etc.) educators from any domain. While Elizabeth offers a short overview of common open science practices and perspectives, the focus will be on Jupyter notebooks as the primary medium for lesson development and publication.

Biosketch:
Elizabeth Wickes is a lecturer at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois, where she teaches foundational programming and information technology courses. Previously, Elizabeth was a data curation specialist for the Research Data Service at the University Library of the University of Illinois and the curation manager for Wolfram|Alpha. She currently co-organizes the Champaign-Urbana Python user group, has been a Carpentries instructor since 2015 and a trainer since 2017, and is an elected member of the Carpentries executive council for 2018.

[Rerun of a presentation at JupyterCon 2018.]Read more




CIRSS Seminar: *MONDAY*  Hard Shouldn't be Hardship: Supporting Absolute Novices to Python
2018-04-30
When we tell novices that programming is hard, what are we warning them about? The intent may be to impress upon learners the importance of taking the workload seriously and starting early on the homework. However, “hard” is a loaded word and leaving novices alone with that word and their imaginations can create an unbounded variable, normalizing emotional extremes and all nighters. The instructor often has no idea that "hard" has become "hardship".

An instructor's expertise can become a blindspot. We've learned what is normal through experience and can easily forget that we didn't know from the start. We presume that those experiencing trouble will stop and reach out for help, but this will not always be the case if they don't know those situations look like. Saying "when you're stuck" is not an objective, actionable statement and leaves the unbounded suffering monster in play, particularly for students who are afraid of being a bother or being seen as asking a stupid question. We need to be clear with our learners about when difficult material has moved outside our expectations and create a classroom environment where questions and clarifications are celebrated.

This talk will cover real and practical methods to help learners succeed in intensive programming courses, such as making your expectations clear, helping your students recognize when and how they should reach out for help, creating a positive emotional atmosphere in the classroom, and providing help efficiently. Topics will include a ban on demotivational words, strategies for soliciting questions, the "2 hour" rule, the educational benefits of live coding, and recontextualizing error messages.

Bio:
Elizabeth Wickes is a Lecturer at the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois, where she teaches programming and information technology courses. She was previously a Data Curation Specialist for the Research Data Service at the University Library of the University of Illinois, and the Curation Manager for Wolfram|Alpha. She currently co-organizes the Champaign-Urbana Python user group and is a Software Carpentry instructor.

[Conference presentation preview for PyCon 2018 in Cleveland OH.]Read more




CIRSS Seminar: Illinois Databank (IDB) development preliminary report from the Illinois Research Data Service (RDS)
2016-04-01
Set to launch in late May, the Illinois Data Bank (IDB) is a self-deposit public access institutional data repository designed to publicly host data produced by Illinois researchers. Members of the Research Data Service (RDS) team will present on the design challenges of working with the DataCite metadata schema, a brief summary of UX and project management methods, and discuss future development goals for the repository. The IDB deposit system will be demonstrated and the RDS team is eager for feedback and comments from the GSLIS community.

Biosketches:

Heidi Imker is the Director of the Research Data Service (RDS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The RDS is a newly formed campus-wide service headquartered in the University Library that provides the Illinois research community with the expertise, tools, and infrastructure necessary to manage and steward research data. Prior to joining the Library, Heidi was the Executive Director of the Enzyme Function Initiative, a large-scale collaborative center involving nine universities, funded by the National Institutes of Health, and located in the Institute for Genomic Biology. Heidi holds a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Illinois, and did her postdoctoral research at the Harvard Medical School.

Elizabeth Wickes is a Data Curation Specialist for the Research Data Service at the University Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is a MS student at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science where she completed coursework in data curation and analytics. She currently co-organizes a Python user group, is a Software Carpentry instructor, and has previously worked as the Curation Manager for Wolfram|Alpha.

Elise Dunham is a Data Curation Specialist for the Research Data Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She holds an MLS from the Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science where she specialized in archives and metadata. She contributes to the development of the Illinois Data Bank in areas of metadata management, repository policy, and workflow development. Currently she co-chairs the proposed Research Data Alliance Archives and Records Professionals for Research Data Interest Group and is leading the DACS workshop revision working group of the Society of American Archivists Technical Subcommittee for Describing Archives: A Content Standard.
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E-Research Roundtable: Summer research experience recaps
2014-11-12
Three students will present on their Summer 2014 internship projects.

Kiumars Sotlani completed an internship at Microsoft Research, helping the Bing Core UX team with multiple data analysis tasks. The main goal of the internship was to design an automatic anomaly detection framework for latency data. Bing answers millions of queries everyday and it is critical to track latency of queries to ensure a desirable user experience. While there are engineers who constantly monitor the latency data to find anomalous behaviors, it is quite hard to pinpoint performance anomalies and their start time due to 1- complex nature of user interactions with the system, 2- Noisy nature of the dataset and 3- Massive size of the data. Therefore it is crucial to have an intelligent framework that trains itself with the historical data and efficiently detect performance anomalies with high accuracy.  Ad-hoc analysis was performed to reveal some previously unknown patterns in the performance data that helps engineers to predict root causes of performance regressions.  Overall, it was a fantastic experience to work with industry’s cutting edge technologies and some of the most talented engineers and scientists in Microsoft.

Jamie Wittenberg completed an internship project related to Research Objects within the Oxford e-Research Centre, where she conducted her work in collaboration with Dr. David De Roure, Kevin Page, and John Pybus. The Research Objects project was driven by community demand for an environment within which scientists can manage and exchange scholarly outputs that do not conform to traditional standards of research publication, but are crucial for interpreting, verifying, and reviewing results (Bechhofer et al., 2013).  Over the course of her project, Wittenberg developed a more comprehensive understanding of linked open data solutions and models including OAI-ORE, Open Annotation, and PROV.

Elizabeth Wickes completed an internship project within the digital repository group at the Bodleian Libraries, where she worked closely with Sarah Barkla, Research Archive Librarian, Oliver Bridle, Biology and Forestry Subject Librarian, and many others within the Bodleian Digital Library Systems and Services (BDLSS) team.  The project involved preparing 12GB of digitized scholarly literature materials for ingestion into existing and in-development repository systems hosted by the Bodleian Libraries.  These materials were part of the Oxford Forestry library collection, and consisted of journal articles, occasional papers, and other literature produced by the Oxford Forestry Institute. 

Bios:

Kiumars Sotlani is a third year PhD student in the Informatics program. His research is focused on analyzing and visualizing massive geospatial datasets to reveal patterns in entities (e.g. people, topics, etc) over time. He is part of the CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) group and also collaborates with Jana Diesner in GSLIS.  Before joining UIUC, he completed a bachelor of science in applied mathematics in Sharif University of Technology, and spent a year in the M.Sc. in Mathematics program in University of British Columbia, Okanagan.

Jamie Wittenberg is a second year masters student at GSLIS specializing in data curation, has an undergraduate degree in Literary Studies and a Master’s in British Studies.  Her research centers around the provenance of digital cultural heritage objects and digital preservation.

Elizabeth Wickes is a first year masters student, has a background in professional curation work at Wolfram|Alpha, and an undergraduate degree in sociology.  She is pursuing a dual specialization in data curation and socio-technical data analytics at GSLIS.
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